• How are Oak Galls formed?

    Galls arise as the plants response to another living organism such as an insect, mite, fungus, nematode or bacteria invading it. These growths generally form in the faster growing, soft, plant tissue such as new leaves, buds and flowers. Mature parts are seldom affected by gall-inducing organisms. Gall growth is triggered and then regulated by […]

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  • Find out more about oak galls

    Many trees have galls growing on them. Galls come in all shapes and sizes. But what are they, how do they form and do they harm their hosts. Read on … What is a gall? A gall is an abnormal but characteristic growth produced by a host plant in response to the presence of another […]

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  • Treefold: East

    Rob and Harriet Fraser are running one of eight Tree Charter artists in residence around the UK. Here, they explain how their project will create a living legacy for the Tree Charter and Long View projects in the Cumbrian Landscape. You can find the original piece on the Long View website. More about treefolds and […]

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  • Trees in the British imagination

    James Bartholomeusz, Campaigns and Policy Assistant, Campaign to Protect Rural England. Find out more about CPRE on their website. There is something reassuring about the solidity of trees. As species with middling lifespans, we humans are used to seeing other creatures be born, thrive and die back in the churn of succession. Trees, however, tend […]

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  • Working With Wood

    This blog is by Andy Ritchie. Andy retired from the City about six years ago, and took up woodcarving as a hobby. He specialises in birds, butterflies and dragonflies, some of which you can see in this blog. To find out more about his work and commissions, please visit his website. Ten years ago, when I […]

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  • Tree Charter Artists – Grafting Histories

    Christine Mackey, one of eight Tree Charter artists in residence around the UK, explains how her project will explore how communities in Northern Ireland interact with trees and each other through woodland. “I would like to find out how the local communities actively use the different woodland landscapes today, inviting them to share both their personal […]

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  • Northern Ireland’s ecological disaster: the untold story

    This article has been reblogged from Scope, the policy magazine for Northern Ireland, which is funded by the Northern Ireland Council for Voluntary Action. The article was written by Nick Garbutt, and the original can be found on their website. Campaigners are setting about tackling Northern Ireland’s least known and most devastating ecological disaster, Scope […]

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  • Bassaleg Community Woodland Trust

    This blog has been written by Victoria Cox-Wall, trustee of Bassaleg Community Woodland Trust. Bassaleg is a semi rural village on the outskirts of Newport and I was a Community Councillor here for 4 years. The village has green corridors and pockets of woodland, plus two public parks, but despite being dominated by verdant farmland and […]

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  • LEAF! The Newspaper for Trees, Woods and People

    Common Ground and the Woodland Trust have joined forces to produce a seasonal newspaper for trees, woods and people that we hope will inspire people to reflect on the incredible ways that trees and people are benefiting each other across the UK. Through the creation of the Tree Charter we want to ensure that remarkable […]

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  • Tree Charter Artists – Treefolds

    As part of the Tree Charter arts programme, there will be 8 artists in residence around the UK across the summer of 2017. Each week we will have a blog focussing in on one aspect of the arts programme. This blog is about Rob and Harriet Fraser, who have been working with the Tree Charter […]

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