We need you to help us understand what people want and need from the UK’s trees. Add your voice and help us create the charter. You could tell us about a tree that is special to you, an experience you’ve had in a wood or share your thoughts on how trees and woods make you feel. It can be a short memory or a quick anecdote, or something longer.

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  • The Woods Cannot be Beaten I love the sea with its crashing waves, And my Yorkshire soul can yearn for barren moorlands. I stand in awe of majestic mountains And relax by rivers glistening in the vale. These landscapes uplift me and ease the daily pressures, But for serenity and wonder The woodland takes some beating. The gnarly trunks and dappled light, The bluebells or the soft pine carpet, With hues of green and a sense of calm The woodland takes some beating. And with the climate warming, changing, We need the trees now more than ever. For acting as an air conditioner, The woodland takes some beating. And then the woods within my home, Oak to walk on, tables of ash, a bed of sycamore, The humble plywood of my desk And paperback upon it. The coast and hills can light my soul, But it's the wood that fuels the fire. For practical provisions The woodland takes some beating. When children whinge and resist fresh air The woodland meets the challenge. With swords of branches and hide and seek, Nature's dens and climbing frames, The mood enhancer takes effect And sounds of laughter soon ring out. For harmony and happy memories, The woodland takes some beating. So take me when I’m tired and weary When I need a clear perspective To see the trees and cleanse my soul The woods cannot be beaten

    I love the sea with its crashing waves, And my Yorkshire soul can yearn for barren moorlands. I stand in awe of majestic mountains And relax by rivers glistening in the vale. These landscapes uplift me and ease the daily pressures, But for serenity and wonder The woodland takes some beating. The gnarly trunks and read more

  • I Was Tree Blind, But Now I Can See I've cycled to most of the Great Trees of London over the summer and am now wading through as many other notable trees in London as I can find from the Tree Register. Its been a thoroughly enjoyable and educational experience.and I've been amazed at how many stunning trees I've cycled or walked past and missed so many before, I was tree blind but now I can see.

    I have cycled to most of the Great Trees of London over the summer and I am now wading through as many other notable trees in London as I can find from the Tree Register. It has been a thoroughly enjoyable and educational experience. And I have been amazed at how many stunning trees I read more

  • Climbing Trees Growing up in the 1950's and 60's I spent my school years in a Pit village in South Yorkshire (Dinnington). With my best friend John Thickitt we had few open spaces to play so anywhere with trees was special. Our local graveyard, looking over a giant mountain of mine spoil (the pit tip) was fringed with trees which we loved to climb. Our favourite game was to climb the Ash trees nearest our play area, which we imaginatively called numbers one, two and three! Number One tree was shredded (all branches trimmed back, leaving just stumps, ideal for climbing. From these stumps we would dare each other to jump down onto the grass from the highest possible level. We never came to any harm and it helped develop our senses as well as love of nature, which for both of us has not diminished. In fact we climbed trees everywhere we went, long before health and safety was thought of. The first photo show us climbing Number One Ash in 1961 (Ian at the top, John below). The second photo shows Ian climbing a Silver Birch in Sherwood Forest with Uncle John Mackenzie in his sunday suit (also around the same time 1961-62).

    Growing up in the 1950’s and 60’s I spent my school years in a Pit village in South Yorkshire (Dinnington). With my best friend John Thickitt we had few open spaces to play so anywhere with trees was special. Our local graveyard, looking over a giant mountain of mine spoil (the pit tip) was fringed read more

  • Taking a Break in a Clearing A visitor walked into our kitchen and exclaimed, "It's a tree house!" It isn't really, but the house is on the side of an ancient glen and all we can see out of our windows are trees and sky. We love them. The fifty shades of green, the autumn tints, the evergreens and the diverse wildlife that inhabits them. My grandsons were helping their grandfather with some clearance and took a break. I came out to look for them and snapped this photo. It was not posed and is probably the best photo I have ever taken.

    A visitor walked into our kitchen and exclaimed, “It’s a tree house!”. It isn’t really, but the house is on the side of an ancient glen and all we can see out of our windows are trees and sky. We love them. The fifty shades of green, the autumn tints, the evergreens and the diverse read more

  • Bushy Blue Trees are my sanctuary, inspiration and now my career as an artist. I consider them the lungs of London and they always bring fresh air whenever I feel life in the city or life gets too much.

    Trees are my sanctuary, inspiration and now my career as an artist. I consider them the lungs of London. They always bring fresh air whenever I feel life in the city or life gets too much.