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  • A long standing friend of Christine Atkins, Sharon Bunch who lives in California came over to the UK for the first time in June 2014 on holiday and amongst other things wanted to see one of our oldest oak trees known as the Fredville Oak. The particular oak tree is near the village of Nonington in Kent. Sharon had known about this tree whilst living in California and was keen to visit this famous oak. Christine Atkins and I collected Sharon from Heathrow and we then made our way to Christines home in Broadstairs. A couple of days later, on the 9th June, which was a particularly warm day, Sharon and myself set off to discover the Fredville Oak. Having walked the length of Fredville Park, Sharon and I, with no site of the famous oak tree suggested we backtracked to another path which we then took. This path led us to a large house and a garden and sitting outside, I seem to recall, was a gentleman whom we then spoke with. I don't recall the gentlemans name but guided by him we were shown the Fredville Oak, a truly magnificient old oak tree. It's appearance had changed from what we were expecting due to a very large double branch that had fallen, recently. This is shown in the photograph that Sharon took, of this oak tree. All in all the visit to Fredville Park was particularly interesting, not just because of the oak tree that we saw but also for several old Sweet Chestnut trees that we found, scattered around the park.

    Sharon and the Fredville Oak

    A long standing friend of Christine Atkins, Sharon Bunch who lives in California came over to the UK for the first time in June 2014 on holiday and amongst other things wanted to see one of our oldest oak trees known as the Fredville Oak. The particular oak tree is

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  • When I moved to London 10 years ago I lived in a flat, and in an area of London where barely any trees existed. I hadn't realised how much trees and outdoor space added to my existence until that point. I gravitated towards parks, and lay on the grass looking up at the swaying branches and rustling leaves and I felt as if a great thirst was being quenched, a 'soul-need' was being satisfied. Trees and nature offer the antidote to noise and bustle and action and concrete that abounds in a city. They bring balance to heart, mind and soul. Whenever I have a dilemma or a question I am seeking an answer to, I look to trees. I believe nature is a great teacher, and trees are so easy to relate to! Steady, calm, and always there. I'm still in London. The photo is of my back garden - we can't see anything but trees! And I love it. For trees, I am so grateful!

    Blissful Calm

    When I moved to London 10 years ago I lived in a flat, and in an area of London where barely any trees existed. I hadn’t realised how much trees and outdoor space added to my existence until that point. I gravitated towards parks, and lay on the grass looking

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  • Trree years ago I invested in buying a small plot of semi natural woodland in the south of England wit my husband. My view was that it would help heal him from the rigours of working in the City for 28 years. The wood had been neglected and our plan was to restore the hazel coppice for flora and fauna. A year later I was diagnosed with cancer of the tongue and had surgery to remove a section of it. It was painful and for some time afterwards I could not eat or speak properly. When I went shopping I was afraid that people would talk to me. When I had to speak my words sounded slurred and people must have thought I was drunk or that I was deaf and so raised their voice when speaking to me! Our wood was a haven of peace where I did not have to speak to anyone.I could just Be. I carried a whistle so that I could communicate if I needed to. Gradially thinge improved and I was able to speak normally again. Being amongst the trees and the natural world and having something meaningful to do helped to heal me.the cancer has not returned and I have made it my mission to promote the beneficial effects of spending time outdoors to as many people as I can.

    A Wood, a Woman and a Whistle

    Three years ago I invested in buying a small plot of semi natural woodland in the South of England with my husband. My view was that it would help heal him from the rigours of working in the City for 28 years. The wood had been neglected and our plan

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